Satellite camera deployed!

Wooo hoo!

The camera is live – here is some video of us half way through the set up. The battery was a huge lump to trek up the hill, but we got everything working well.

This camera is the first remote sat camera of the Instant Wild/Cambridge Consultant collaboration (www.edgeofexistence.org/instantwild/). It’s an advanced prototype and it’s taken a long time to get it here, so thanks to everyone who have worked so hard and then let me steal it. It’s not even like I’m going to look after it!

Al Davies from ZSL is on board to set it up – there’s a lot of troubleshooting to get the first working. This has involved setting up cameras on the ship’s rail, then scurrying down to his cabin to check email for a photo.


Setting up the camera rig

Al checks the satphone to Cambridge Consultants - the people who built the sat camera with him. It's best to check that it's sending before we leave it for a year...

Al checks the satphone to Cambridge Consultants – the people who built the sat camera with him. It’s best to check that it’s sending before we leave it for a year…

So, after an attempt to get to Detaille was rebutted by ice, we headed to the Yalours. We hiked a lot of equipment up a small hill, but it did reveal to us that there’s a little way to go yet on the power supply to make it really portable. We massively over-specked the power requirements to make sure it won’t die even if the solar cell fails. We had a bit of a scramble, but managed to set up two cameras looking at the penguins and one looking at the installation. It was a race, but we walked away relatively confident that it might survive! Special thanks to Woody the Expedition Leader for giving us some extra time ashore to guarantee the installation. Also, thanks to Wolfgang who came to pick us up when he should have been having dinner.

The important photo – this photo went to space and back…twice! We routed it back to the ship to test everything. Now it’s clearly working- the only question is how well it will survive the winter. Let’s hope all of those holes and connectors work.

cam:13 img:0030

cam:13 img:0031

cam:13 img:0043

cam:13 img:0044

cam:13 img:0045

...and this is the one that Al watches.

…and this is the one that Al watches.

Relief and happy days!

Hope all is well in the real world…

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